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Sci Data. 2018 Oct 30;5:180213. doi: 10.1038/sdata.2018.213.

Methylome of human skeletal muscle after acute & chronic resistance exercise training, detraining & retraining.

Author information

1
Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine (ISTM), School of Medicine, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom.
2
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
3
Centre for Genomics and Child Health, Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
4
Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
5
School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom.
6
The Genome Centre, Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Abstract

DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that can regulate gene expression following environmental encounters without changes to the genetic code. Using Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip Arrays (850,000 CpG sites) we analysed for the first time, DNA isolated from untrained human skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) at baseline (rest) and immediately following an acute (single) bout of resistance exercise. In the same participants, we also analysed the methylome following a period of muscle growth (hypertrophy) evoked via chronic (repeated bouts-3 sessions/wk) resistance exercise (RE) (training) over 7-weeks, followed by complete exercise cessation for 7-weeks returning muscle back to baseline levels (detraining), and finally followed by a subsequent 7-week period of RE-induced hypertrophy (retraining). These valuable methylome data sets described in the present manuscript and deposited in an open-access repository can now be shared and re-used to enable the identification of epigenetically regulated genes/networks that are modified after acute anabolic stimuli and hypertrophy, and further investigate the phenomenon of epigenetic memory in skeletal muscle.

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