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Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 Oct 29. doi: 10.1038/s41431-018-0290-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Deletion in 2q35 excluding the IHH gene leads to fetal severe limb anomalies and suggests a disruption of chromatin architecture.

Author information

1
CHU Bordeaux, Service de Génétique Médicale, F-33076, Bordeaux, France. aurelien.trimouille@chu-bordeaux.fr.
2
Université de Bordeaux; INSERM U1211, Maladies Rares, Génétique et Métabolisme (MRGM), Bordeaux, France. aurelien.trimouille@chu-bordeaux.fr.
3
Université de Bordeaux; INSERM U1211, Maladies Rares, Génétique et Métabolisme (MRGM), Bordeaux, France.
4
CHU Bordeaux, Service de Génétique Médicale, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.
5
CHU Bordeaux, Service de Pathologie, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.

Abstract

The organization of mammalian genomes into sub-megabase sized Topologically Associated Domains (TADs) has recently been revealed by techniques derived from Chromosome Conformation Capture (3 C), such as High Chromosome Contact map (Hi-C). Disruption of this organization by structural variations can lead to ectopic interactions between enhancers and promoters, and to alteration of genes expression patterns. This mechanism has already been described as the main pathophysiological mechanism in several syndromes with congenital malformations. We describe here the case of a fetus with a severe multiple congenital anomalies syndrome, including extensive polydactyly of the four limbs. This fetus carries a de novo deletion next to the IHH gene, encompassing a TAD boundary. Such an IHH TAD boundary deletion has already been described in the Dbf mouse model, which shows a quite similar, but less severe phenotype. We hypothesize that the deletion harbored by this fetus results in the same pathophysiological mechanisms as those of the Dbf model. The description of this case expands the spectrum of the disruption of chromatin architecture of WNT6/IHH/EPHA4/PAX3 locus, and could help to understand the mechanisms of chromatin interactions at this locus.

PMID:
30374058
DOI:
10.1038/s41431-018-0290-4

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