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Alzheimers Dement. 2018 Oct 25. pii: S1552-5260(18)33555-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.09.008. [Epub ahead of print]

Hypertension and obesity moderate the relationship between β-amyloid and cognitive decline in midlife.

Author information

1
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: lrclark@medicine.wisc.edu.
2
Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
3
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
4
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Medical Scientist and Neuroscience Training Programs, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
5
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.
6
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA.
7
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Waisman Center and Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.
8
Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study tested if central obesity, hypertension, or depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between β-amyloid (Aβ) and longitudinal cognitive performance in late middle-aged adults enriched for Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk.

METHODS:

Participants (n = 207; ages = 40-70 years; 73% parental AD) in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study completed 3+ neuropsychological evaluations and a [11C]PiB positron emission tomography scan or lumbar puncture. Linear mixed-effects regression models tested interactions of risk factor × Aβ × visit age on longitudinal Verbal Learning & Memory and Speed & Flexibility factor scores.

RESULTS:

The relationship between Aβ and Verbal Learning & Memory decline was moderated by hypertension (χ2(1) = 3.85, P = .04) and obesity (χ2(1) = 6.12, P = .01); those with both elevated Aβ and the risk factor declined at faster rates than those with only elevated Aβ or elevated risk factors.

CONCLUSION:

In this cohort, hypertension and obesity moderated the relationship between Aβ and cognitive decline.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Hypertension; Neuropsychology; Obesity; Preclinical Alzheimer's disease; β-amyloid

PMID:
30367828
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2018.09.008

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