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Food Chem Toxicol. 2019 Jan;123:106-112. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2018.10.040. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Reproductive and developmental toxicity study of caffeic acid in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Hematology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
2
Institute of Materia Medica, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, China.
3
Qilu Medical College of Shandong University, Jinan, China.
4
Department of Rheumatology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
5
Department of Hematology, Jining No. 1 People's Hospital, Jining, China.
6
Department of Hematology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China; Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Immunohematology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China; Leading Research Group of Scientific Innovation, Department of Science and Technology of Shandong Province, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China. Electronic address: qlhouming@sina.com.

Abstract

Caffeic acid is an antioxidant commonly used to promote hematopoiesis and hemostasis. However, little is known about its systemic safety profile in reproduction and development. Here, we focused on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of caffeic acid in F0 female mice and F1 offspring. In the three-segment study, the F0 female mice were continuously exposed to 0, 0.15, 5 or 150 mg/kg/day of caffeic acid by gavage. We found that 5 mg/kg/day and 150 mg/kg/day of caffeic acid affected implantation of embryos when administered before gestation day 6. In addition, 150 mg/kg/day of caffeic acid affected fetal weight gain. No maternal toxicity, fetal teratogenesis or post-natal effects on pup development were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level was 0.15 mg/kg/day for pregnant mice under the conditions of this study.

KEYWORDS:

Caffeic acid; Developmental toxicity; Reproductive toxicity; Teratogenicity; Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy

PMID:
30366071
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2018.10.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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