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Osteoporos Int. 2019 Jan;30(1):145-153. doi: 10.1007/s00198-018-4747-7. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Length of hospital stay after hip fracture surgery and 1-year mortality.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Clinical Research Center, Asan Medical Center, 88, 43-gil Olympic-ro, Songpa-gu, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Elderly Frailty Research Center, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Department of Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea.
5
Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea. chunwon62@naver.com.

Abstract

There is ongoing effort to discharge patients early after hip fracture surgery to reduce the medical and economic burden. We tried to find whether there is any related side effect, and discovered that early discharge, especially before 10 days after surgery, is associated with higher mortality.

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to analyze the association between the length of hospital stay after hip fracture and 1-year mortality in older adults aged ≥ 65 years old.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Korean National Health Insurance Service data to identify patients who were discharged after hip fracture surgery from 2007 to 2009 among 487,460 older adults of age ≥ 65 years. The lengths of stay involving hip fracture surgery were categorized at 10-day interval, and analyzed in relation to 1-year mortality from the date of hospital discharge.

RESULTS:

A total of 4213 patients were discharged after hip fracture surgery, of whom 604 (14.3%) died within 1 year of discharge. The average length of stay was 30.7 days (standard deviation 24.5 days). The 1-year mortality was the highest for the length of stay ≤ 10 days group at 21.7%, followed by 15.2%, 14.3%, 13.3%, and 12.4% for > 40, 21-30, 31-40, and 11-20 days groups, respectively (p value 0.05). On Cox proportional hazard regression, the adjusted hazard ratio for length of stay ≤ 10 days group was 1.56 (95% confidence interval 1.14-2.12) against the reference group (11-20 days), while other groups did not show statistical significance. Higher risk of death was associated with increasing age, male gender, Charlson comorbidity index ≥3, subtrochanteric fracture, and discharge to tertiary care hospitals and long-term care hospitals.

CONCLUSION:

Older adults discharged within 10 days of hospital admission for hip fracture surgery have higher 1-year mortality after discharge.

KEYWORDS:

Frail elderly; Healthcare administrative claims; Hip fractures; Mortality

PMID:
30361752
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-018-4747-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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