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Nat Commun. 2018 Oct 25;9(1):4437. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06876-w.

Medial temporal lobe functional connectivity predicts stimulation-induced theta power.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA. esolo@pennmedicine.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Department of Physiology and Bioengineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.
7
Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
8
Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA.
9
Department of Neurology, Dartmouth Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, 03756, USA.
10
Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
11
Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
12
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA. kahana@psych.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Focal electrical stimulation of the brain incites a cascade of neural activity that propagates from the stimulated region to both nearby and remote areas, offering the potential to control the activity of brain networks. Understanding how exogenous electrical signals perturb such networks in humans is key to its clinical translation. To investigate this, we applied electrical stimulation to subregions of the medial temporal lobe in 26 neurosurgical patients fitted with indwelling electrodes. Networks of low-frequency (5-13 Hz) spectral coherence predicted stimulation-evoked increases in theta (5-8 Hz) power, particularly when stimulation was applied in or adjacent to white matter. Stimulation tended to decrease power in the high-frequency broadband (HFB; 50-200 Hz) range, and these modulations were correlated with HFB-based networks in a subset of subjects. Our results demonstrate that functional connectivity is predictive of causal changes in the brain, capturing evoked activity across brain regions and frequency bands.

PMID:
30361627
PMCID:
PMC6202342
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-06876-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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