Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Oct 25;8(1):15777. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-34226-9.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging for tracking cellular patterns obtained by Laser-Assisted Bioprinting.

Author information

1
INSERM, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, U1026, F-33076, Bordeaux, France. olivia.kerouredan@u-bordeaux.fr.
2
CHU de Bordeaux, Services d'Odontologie et de Santé Buccale, F-33076, Bordeaux, France. olivia.kerouredan@u-bordeaux.fr.
3
Centre de Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR5536, CNRS/Univ. Bordeaux, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.
4
INSERM, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, U1026, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.
5
CHU de Bordeaux, Services d'Odontologie et de Santé Buccale, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.
6
ART BioPrint, INSERM, U1026, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.

Abstract

Recent advances in the field of Tissue Engineering allowed to control the three-dimensional organization of engineered constructs. Cell pattern imaging and in vivo follow-up remain a major hurdle in in situ bioprinting onto deep tissues. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) associated with Micron-sized superParamagnetic Iron Oxide (MPIO) particles constitutes a non-invasive method for tracking cells in vivo. To date, no studies have utilized Cellular MRI as a tool to follow cell patterns obtained via bioprinting technologies. Laser-Assisted Bioprinting (LAB) has been increasingly recognized as a new and exciting addition to the bioprinting's arsenal, due to its rapidity, precision and ability to print viable cells. This non-contact technology has been successfully used in recent in vivo applications. The aim of this study was to assess the methodology of tracking MPIO-labeled stem cells using MRI after organizing them by Laser-Assisted Bioprinting. Optimal MPIO concentrations for tracking bioprinted cells were determined. Accuracy of printed patterns was compared using MRI and confocal microscopy. Cell densities within the patterns and MRI signals were correlated. MRI enabled to detect cell patterns after in situ bioprinting onto a mouse calvarial defect. Results demonstrate that MRI combined with MPIO cell labeling is a valuable technique to track bioprinted cells in vitro and in animal models.

PMID:
30361490
PMCID:
PMC6202323
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-34226-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center