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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019 Jan;67(1):81-86. doi: 10.1111/jgs.15607. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Cognition and Vitamin D in Older African-American Women- Physical performance and Osteoporosis prevention with vitamin D in older African Americans Trial and Dementia.

Author information

1
Bone Mineral Research Center, New York University Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, New York.
2
Adena Health System, Chillicothe, Ohio.
3
South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, New York.
4
University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
5
State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels recommended by Endocrine Society guidelines (>30 ng/mL) on cognition in healthy older African-American women over 3 years.

DESIGN:

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING:

Bone Mineral Research Center at New York University Winthrop Hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Healthy postmenopausal African American women aged 65 and older (N=260; mean age 68.2 ± 4.9; 46% college education or higher).

INTERVENTION:

Half of the women were randomized to receive vitamin D (adjusted to achieve a serum level > 30 ng/mL) with calcium (diet and supplement total of 1,200 mg), and half were randomized to receive placebo with calcium (1,200 mg).

MEASUREMENTS:

Cognitive assessments every 6 months using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) to detect cognitive decline. Mean MMSE scores were calculated over time for both groups. Those with MMSE scores less than 21 at baseline were excluded.

RESULTS:

The average dose of vitamin D3 was 3,490 ± 1,465 IU per day, and average serum 25(OH)D at 3 years was 46.8 ± 1.2 ng/mL in the active group and 20.7 ± 1.1 ng/mL in the placebo group. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was maintained at greater than 30 ng/mL in 90% of the active group. Over the 3-year period, MMSE scores increased in both groups (p < .001), although change over time was not significantly different between the groups. No adverse events associated with vitamin D were observed.

CONCLUSION:

There was no difference in cognition over time between older African-American women with serum concentrations of 25(OH)D of 30 ng/mL and greater than those taking placebo. There is no evidence to support vitamin D intake greater than the recommended daily allowance in this population for preventing cognitive decline. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:81-86, 2019.

KEYWORDS:

African American; calcium; cognition; dementia; vitamin D

PMID:
30359476
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.15607

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