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Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2019 Feb;19(1):165-176. doi: 10.3758/s13415-018-00654-3.

Functional connectivity of specific resting-state networks predicts trust and reciprocity in the trust game.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology I, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
3
AU MRI Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
5
Center for Health Ecology and Equity Research, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
6
Alabama Advanced Imaging Consortium, Auburn University and University of Alabama Birmingham, Auburn, AL, USA.
7
School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 22030, USA. FKrueger@gmu.edu.
8
Department of Psychology, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany. FKrueger@gmu.edu.

Abstract

Economic games are used to elicit a social, conflictual situation in which people have to make decisions weighing self-related and collective interests. Combining these games with task-based fMRI has been shown to be successful in investigating the neural underpinnings of cooperative behaviors. However, it remains elusive to which extent resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) represents an individual's propensity to prosocial behaviors in the context of economic games. Here, we investigated whether task-free RSFC predicts individual differences in the propensity to trust and reciprocate in a one-round trust game (TG) employing a prediction-analytics framework. Our results demonstrated that individual differences in the propensity to trust and reciprocity could be predicted by individual differences in the RSFC. Different subnetworks of the default-mode network associated with mentalizing exclusively predicted trust and reciprocity. Moreover, reciprocity was further predicted by the frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular networks associated with cognitive control and saliency, respectively. Our results contribute to a better understanding of how complex social behaviors are enrooted in large-scale intrinsic brain dynamics, which may represent neuromarkers for impairment of prosocial behavior in mental health disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Machine learning; Multivariate regression analysis; Reciprocity; Resting-state functional connectivity; Trust; Trust game

PMID:
30357662
DOI:
10.3758/s13415-018-00654-3

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