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Primates. 2018 Nov;59(6):553-570. doi: 10.1007/s10329-018-0694-3. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

The Japan Monkey Centre Primates Brain Imaging Repository for comparative neuroscience: an archive of digital records including records for endangered species.

Author information

1
The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA. sakai.tomoko.5w@gmail.com.
2
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. sakai.tomoko.5w@gmail.com.
3
Division of Regenerative Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. sakai.tomoko.5w@gmail.com.
4
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan. sakai.tomoko.5w@gmail.com.
5
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Division of Regenerative Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Laboratory for Marmoset Neural Architecture, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
8
Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
9
Japan Monkey Centre, Inuyama, Japan.
10
Faculty of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan.
11
The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.
12
F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kenney Krieger Institute, Baltimore, USA.
13
Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Japan.

Abstract

Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational analysis technology have enabled comparisons among various primate brains in a three-dimensional electronic format. Results from comparative studies provide information about common features across primates and species-specific features of neuroanatomy. Investigation of various species of non-human primates is important for understanding such features, but the majority of comparative MRI studies have been based on experimental primates, such as common marmoset, macaques, and chimpanzee. A major obstacle has been the lack of a database that includes non-experimental primates' brain MRIs. To facilitate scientific discoveries in the field of comparative neuroanatomy and brain evolution, we launched a collaborative project to develop an open-resource repository of non-human primate brain images obtained using ex vivo MRI. As an initial open resource, here we release a collection of structural MRI and diffusion tensor images obtained from 12 species: pygmy marmoset, owl monkey, white-fronted capuchin, crab-eating macaque, Japanese macaque, bonnet macaque, toque macaque, Sykes' monkey, red-tailed monkey, Schmidt's guenon, de Brazza's guenon, and lar gibbon. Sixteen postmortem brain samples from the 12 species, stored in the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC), were scanned using a 9.4-T MRI scanner and made available through the JMC collaborative research program ( http://www.j-monkey.jp/BIR/index_e.html ). The expected significant contributions of the JMC Primates Brain Imaging Repository include (1) resources for comparative neuroscience research, (2) preservation of various primate brains, including those of endangered species, in a permanent digital form, (3) resources with higher resolution for identifying neuroanatomical features, compared to previous MRI atlases, (4) resources for optimizing methods of scanning large fixed brains, and (5) references for veterinary neuroradiology. User-initiated research projects beyond these contributions are also anticipated.

KEYWORDS:

Brain samples; Comparative neuroscience; Database; Diffusion tensor imaging; Endangered species; Evolution; Magnetic resonance imaging; Primate

PMID:
30357587
DOI:
10.1007/s10329-018-0694-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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