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Urologe A. 2018 Dec;57(12):1445-1451. doi: 10.1007/s00120-018-0795-z.

[HPV infection in women : Diagnostics, treatment and the relevance of vaccination].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Frauenklinik der Technischen Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81765, München, Deutschland.
2
Frauenklinik der Technischen Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81765, München, Deutschland. Monika.Schmidmayr@mri.tum.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Benign, premalignant and malignant changes in the anogenital region, as in the oropharynx are often affected by a persistent HPV infection. Since a causal therapy isn't possible, the focus is on early diagnosis of dysplasia. Better knowledge of the human papilloma virus led to the development of the HPV vaccine and now primary prevention of cancer is possible. These findings will also influence the German cervical cancer screening.

OBJECTIVES:

This article illustrates prevalence, significance, diagnostics, treatment and prevention of HPV infection and HPV-associated diseases in women.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A literature research under pubmed.de has been carried out. In addition up-to-date guidelines and internet-based sources were considered.

RESULTS:

Persistent infection can lead to dysplasia and carcinoma of the cervix, vagina and vulva, the anus and the oropharynx. In future an additional HPV testing is planned to be integrated in the German screening for cervical cancer for women above 35 years. Management of dysplasia is operative or topical. Accordingly, a primary prevention through vaccination is even more important. The German Standing Vaccination Committee recommends the vaccination for girls and boys between 9 to 14 years.

CONCLUSION:

HPV vaccination is a secure and efficient procedure to prevent cancer. In the following years it is of great importance to improve acceptance and vaccination rates.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical cancer; Condylomata acuminata; Pap-smear; Prävention; Squamous intraepithelial lesion

PMID:
30357448
DOI:
10.1007/s00120-018-0795-z

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