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Stroke. 2018 Nov;49(11):2659-2665. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.021993.

Risk of Nursing Home Admission in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

Author information

1
From the Department of Neurology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (M.I.B., J.G.J.W., E.M.C.v.L., E.J.v.D., A.M.T., F.-E.d.L.), Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Diagnostic Image Analysis Group (M.G., B.P.), Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
3
Institute for Computing and Information Sciences, (M.G.), Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
4
Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (D.G.N.), Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
5
Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany (D.G.N.).

Abstract

Background and Purpose- Since cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is associated with cognitive and motor impairment and both might ultimately lead to nursing home admission, our objective was to investigate the association of SVD markers with nursing home admission. Methods- The RUN DMC study (Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort) is a prospective cohort of 503 independent living individuals with SVD. Date of nursing home admission was retrieved from the Dutch municipal personal records database. Risk of nursing home admission was calculated using a competing risk analysis, with mortality as a competing risk. Results- During follow-up (median 8.7 years, interquartile range 8.5-8.9), 31 participants moved to a nursing home. Before nursing home admission, 19 participants were diagnosed with dementia, 6 with parkinsonism, and 10 with stroke. Participants with the lowest white matter volume had an 8-year risk of nursing home admission of 13.3% (95% CI, 8.6-18.9), which was significantly different from participants with middle or highest white matter volume (respectively, 4.8% [95% CI, 2.3-8.8] and 0%; P<0.001). After adjusting for baseline age and living condition, the association of white matter volume and total brain volume with nursing home admission was significant, with, respectively, hazard ratios of 0.88 [95% CI, 0.84-0.95] ( P value 0.025) and 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.98] ( P<0.001) per 10 mL. The association of white matter hyperintensities and lacunes with nursing home admission was not significant. Conclusions- This study demonstrates that in SVD patients, independent from age and living condition, a lower white matter volume and a lower total brain volume is associated with an increased risk of nursing home admission. Nursing home admission is a relevant outcome in SVD research since it might be able to combine both cognitive and functional consequences of SVD in 1 outcome.

KEYWORDS:

cerebral small vessel diseases; dementia; nursing homes; parkinsonian disorders; white matter

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