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J Med Microbiol. 2018 Dec;67(12):1753-1760. doi: 10.1099/jmm.0.000859. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Staphylococcus aureus osteoarticular infections in children: an 8-year review of molecular microbiology, antibiotic resistance and clinical characteristics.

Author information

1
1​Department of Microbiology, "Aghia Sophia" Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece.
2
2​Department of Microbiology, "P. & A. Aglaia Kyriakou" Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece.
3
3​Second Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
4
4​First Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
5
5​National Staphylococcal Reference Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece.
6
6​Department of Microbiology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the clinical, phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains causing osteoarticular infections in a large paediatric series.

METHODOLOGY:

Medical records of children who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of community-associated S. aureus (CA-SA) osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis in the two major tertiary paediatric hospitals of Athens during an 8-year period (2007-2015) were reviewed, and S. aureus isolates were analysed regarding antimicrobial resistance, detection of pathogenicity genes and genotyping using SCCmec, agr typing, PFGE and MLST.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 123 children with CA-SA osteoarticular infections were identified, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for 44 of these (35.8 %). Children with MRSA infection had a significantly higher admission rate to the ICU (5.7  vs 0 %, P=0.04) and longer duration of hospitalization (21.6 vs 16.7 days, P=0.04). Sixty-eight isolates [42 (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus) MSSA and 26 MRSA] were available for molecular analysis. All MRSA strains were mecA-positive and most carried the SCCmec IV cassette (23/26, 88 %) and belonged to the PFGE type C (24/26, 92.3 %), agr type 3 (24/26, 92.3 %) and the MLST ST80 clone (24/26, 92.3 %). In contrast, MSSA strains showed polyclonality by PFGE and agr typing. Regarding pathogenicity genes, MRSA vs MSSA isolates showed higher detection rates of PVL (96.2 vs 4.8 %, P<0.0001) and fib (80.8 vs 50 %, P=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

In our study a considerable number of S. aureus osteoarticular infections were due to CA-MRSA isolates, most of which belonged to the ST80 clone and had a higher incidence of specific virulence factors, entailing higher ICU admission rates and a longer duration of hospitalization.

KEYWORDS:

S. aureus; arthritis; children; osteoarticular; osteomyelitis

PMID:
30351268
DOI:
10.1099/jmm.0.000859

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