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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14064. [Epub ahead of print]

Dance and rehabilitation in cerebral palsy: a systematic search and review.

Author information

1
Neuroscience of Dance in Health and Disability Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
2
Joffrey Ballet Adacemy, The Official School of the Joffrey Ballet, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
Ealing Services for Children with Special Needs, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
6
Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
7
Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

To conduct a review of research literature on the use of dance and movement with music (rhythmic auditory stimulation [RAS]) in the neurorehabilitation of children and adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

METHOD:

We conducted a systematic search and quality appraisal of the research literature on dance and RAS in CP. Additionally, we linked the research outcomes to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework.

RESULTS:

Studies showed preliminary evidence of the benefits of dance and RAS on body functions, particularly balance, gait, walking, and cardiorespiratory fitness for individuals with CP. Research gaps are evident across all domains of the ICF, particularly in the participation and environment domains.

INTERPRETATION:

To facilitate translation of quantitative research outcomes to the clinical classification of the ICF, a table was constructed that links traditional areas of quantitative rehabilitation research with the ICF categories highlighting areas of research strengths and areas where increased rigor is desirable. The potential for dance and RAS to have positive impacts on body functions, emotional expression, social participation, and attitudinal change are indicated areas for consideration in future research.

WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

The potential for dance and movement to music help balance, gait, and walking in children and adults with cerebral palsy. Research gaps are evident across International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains, particularly participation and environment domains.

PMID:
30350851
DOI:
10.1111/dmcn.14064

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