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Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2018 Nov;403(7):825-836. doi: 10.1007/s00423-018-1720-z. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Meta-analysis of patient survival and rate of alcohol relapse in liver-transplanted patients for acute alcoholic hepatitis.

Author information

1
Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
2
The Study Center of the German Surgical Society (SDGC), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 130/3, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
3
Department of Internal Medicine IV, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. arianeb.mehrabi@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This review investigated survival and alcoholic relapse following liver transplantation (LT) in patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AH) without 6 months of alcohol abstinence.

METHODS:

All studies comparing acute AH patients undergoing LT with a control group were included. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases were searched. Survival benefits or odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed by meta-analyses using a random effects model. The study was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42017057971). According to the search results, two separate meta-analyses were performed: meta-analysis A compared early LT with medical therapy alone in patients with severe AH that were not responding to medical therapy and meta-analysis B compared LT outcome in patients with AH and chronic alcoholic cirrhosis (AC).

RESULTS:

The search yielded 2232 articles. Eight studies were included in the two meta-analyses-two studies in meta-analysis A and six studies in meta-analysis B. The two studies (n = 70) included in meta-analysis A revealed that 1-year patient survival was significantly higher in the LT group compared with the medical therapy-alone group (survival benefit, 15.88; 95% CI, 3.98-63.35; p < 0.0001). The six studies in meta-analysis B (including 1091 patients) showed that 1-year (survival benefit, 1.65; 95% CI, 0.95-2.89; p = 0.08), 3-year (survival benefit, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.79-2.18; p = 0.30), and 5-year survival (survival benefit, 1.54; 95% CI, 0.92-2.56; p = 0.10) were not significantly different between AH and AC groups. There was no significant difference in the rate of alcohol relapse between the groups (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.53-2.96; p = 0.60).

CONCLUSIONS:

Early LT is a life-saving treatment for AH patients that do not respond to medical therapy. The chance of alcohol relapse after LT is not increased in selected patients.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol relapse; Alcoholic hepatitis; Liver transplantation; Meta-analysis; Survival

PMID:
30349998
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-018-1720-z

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