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Nat Nanotechnol. 2018 Dec;13(12):1100-1108. doi: 10.1038/s41565-018-0273-1. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Roadmap and strategy for overcoming infusion reactions to nanomedicines.

Author information

1
Nanomedicine Research and Education Center, Institute of Pathophysiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
2
SeroScience Ltd, Budapest, Hungary.
3
Department of Nanobiotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Health, Miskolc University, Miskolc, Hungary.
4
Translational Bio-Nanosciences Laboratory, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, CO, USA.
5
Immunology, Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas (CINBIO), Centro de Investigación Singular de Galicia, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Galicia Sur (IIS-GS), University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
6
Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
7
Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, Cancer Research Technology Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, USA. marina@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Infusion reactions (IRs) are complex, immune-mediated side effects that mainly occur within minutes to hours of receiving a therapeutic dose of intravenously administered pharmaceutical products. These products are diverse and include both traditional pharmaceuticals (for example biological agents and small molecules) and new ones (for example nanotechnology-based products). Although IRs are not unique to nanomedicines, they represent a hurdle for the translation of nanotechnology-based drug products. This Perspective offers a big picture of the pharmaceutical field and examines current understanding of mechanisms responsible for IRs to nanomedicines. We outline outstanding questions, review currently available experimental evidence to provide some answers and highlight the gaps. We review advantages and limitations of the in vitro tests and animal models used for studying IRs to nanomedicines. Finally, we propose a roadmap to improve current understanding, and we recommend a strategy for overcoming the problem.

PMID:
30348955
PMCID:
PMC6320688
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1038/s41565-018-0273-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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