Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2018 Oct 22;373(1761). pii: 20170435. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2017.0435.

Estimating interaction credit for trophic rewilding in tropical forests.

Author information

1
Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway emma-liina.marjakangas@ntnu.no.
2
Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590, Brazil.
3
Departamento de Biologia Animal, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP CEP 13.083-862, Brazil.
4
Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090, Brazil.
5
Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
6
Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, Helsinki FI-00014, Finland.
7
Departamento de Ciências Ambientais, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropédica, RJ 23890-000, Brazil.
8
Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), CP 199, Rio Claro, SP 13506-900, Brazil mgaletti@rc.unesp.br.

Abstract

Trophic rewilding has been suggested as a restoration tool to restore ecological interactions and reverse defaunation and its cascading effects on ecosystem functioning. One of the ecological processes that has been jeopardized by defaunation is animal-mediated seed dispersal. Here, we propose an approach that combines joint species distribution models with occurrence data and species interaction records to quantify the potential to restore seed-dispersal interactions through rewilding and apply it to the Atlantic Forest, a global biodiversity hotspot. Using this approach, we identify areas that should benefit the most from trophic rewilding and candidate species that could contribute to cash the credit of seed-dispersal interactions in a given site. We found that sites within large fragments bearing a great diversity of trees may have about 20 times as many interactions to be cashed through rewilding as small fragments in regions where deforestation has been pervasive. We also ranked mammal and bird species according to their potential to restore seed-dispersal interactions if reintroduced while considering the biome as a whole and at finer scales. The suggested approach can aid future conservation efforts in rewilding projects in defaunated tropical rainforests.This article is part of the theme issue 'Trophic rewilding: consequences for ecosystems under global change'.

KEYWORDS:

Atlantic forest; defaunation; plant–animal interaction; reintroduction; restoration; seed dispersal

PMID:
30348879
PMCID:
PMC6231069
[Available on 2019-12-05]
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2017.0435

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center