Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2018 Oct 23:194599818808774. doi: 10.1177/0194599818808774. [Epub ahead of print]

Pediatric Bacterial Tracheitis-A Variable Entity: Case Series with Literature Review.

Author information

1
1 Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
2
2 Primary Children's Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
3
3 Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review the presentation and treatment of children diagnosed with bacterial tracheitis at our institution and to review the available literature focusing on key presenting symptoms and clinical outcomes of children diagnosed with bacterial tracheitis.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series with literature review.

SETTING:

Tertiary children's hospital and available literature.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Case series of children with bacterial tracheitis retrospectively reviewed at a tertiary children's hospital. Those with a tracheostomy or those who developed bacterial tracheitis as a complication of prolonged intubation were excluded.

RESULTS:

Thirty-six children were identified (mean ± SD age, 6.7 ± 4.5 years). The most common presenting symptom was cough (85%), followed by stridor (77%) and voice changes/hoarseness (67%). A concurrent viral illness was found for 55%, and the most common bacteria cultured was methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Pediatric intensive care admission occurred for 69%, and 43% required intubation. No patient required tracheostomy. One patient (2.7%) died secondary to airway obstruction and subsequent respiratory arrest. Four patients had recurrence of bacterial tracheitis 4 to 12 months following their initial presentation.

CONCLUSION:

Bacterial tracheitis is an uncommon condition with an atypical presentation and variable clinical course but serious consequences if left unrecognized. Staphylococcus is the most common bacteria identified, and many patients will have a prodromal viral illness. Changes in patient epidemiology and presentation may have occurred over time.

KEYWORDS:

bacterial tracheitis; laryngotracheitis; tracheitis

PMID:
30348058
DOI:
10.1177/0194599818808774

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center