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J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2018 Oct 19. doi: 10.1093/jpids/piy099. [Epub ahead of print]

Association of Previous Measles Infection With Markers of Acute Infectious Disease Among 9- to 59-Month-Old Children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles.
2
David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles.
3
School of Medicine, Kinshasa University, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
4
OpGen Incorporated, Gaithersburg, Maryland.
5
Dynex Technologies Incorporated, Chantilly, Virginia.
6
Kinshasa School of Public Health, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
7
National Institute for Biomedical Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
8
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

Background:

Transient immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to other infections after measles infection is well known, but recent studies have suggested the occurrence of an "immune amnesia" that could have long-term immunosuppressive effects.

Methods:

We examined the association between past measles infection and acute episodes of fever, cough, and diarrhea among 2350 children aged 9 to 59 months whose mothers were selected for interview in the 2013-2014 Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). Classification of children who had had measles was completed using maternal recall and measles immunoglobulin G serostatus obtained via dried-blood-spot analysis with a multiplex immunoassay. The association with time since measles infection and fever, cough, and diarrhea outcomes was also examined.

Results:

The odds of fever in the previous 2 weeks were 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-2.60) among children for whom measles was reported compared to children with no history of measles. Measles vaccination demonstrated a protective association against selected clinical markers of acute infectious diseases.

Conclusion:

Our results suggest that measles might have a long-term effect on selected clinical markers of acute infectious diseases among children aged 9 to 59 months in the DRC. These findings support the immune-amnesia hypothesis suggested by others and underscore the need for continued evaluation and improvement of the DRC's measles vaccination program.

PMID:
30346573
DOI:
10.1093/jpids/piy099

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