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J Vis Exp. 2018 Oct 2;(140). doi: 10.3791/58379.

A Hyperandrogenic Mouse Model to Study Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Department of Health, Beijing Military General Hospital.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Southern Medical University.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; swu24@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Hyperandrogenemia plays a critical role in reproductive and metabolic function in females and is the hallmark of polycystic ovary syndrome. Developing a lean PCOS-like mouse model that mimics women with PCOS is clinically meaningful. In this protocol, we describe such a model. By inserting a 4 mm length of DHT (dihydrotestosterone) crystal powder pellet (total length of pellet is 8 mm), and replacing it monthly, we are able to produce a PCOS-like mouse model with serum DHT levels 2 fold higher than mice not implanted with DHT (no-DHT). We observed reproductive and metabolic dysfunction without changing body weight and body composition. While exhibiting a high degree of infertility, a small subset of these PCOS-like female mice can get pregnant and their offspring show delayed puberty and increased testosterone as adults. This PCOS-like lean mouse model is a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of PCOS and the offspring from these PCOS-like dams.

PMID:
30346398
PMCID:
PMC6235414
[Available on 2020-10-02]
DOI:
10.3791/58379
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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