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Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr. 2018 Oct;21(4):264-270. doi: 10.5223/pghn.2018.21.4.264. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Initial Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children Increases a Chance for Resolution of Symptoms.

Author information

1
Referral Centre for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Zagreb, Croatia.
2
School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
3
School of Medicine, University J.J. Strossmayer of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.

Abstract

Purpose:

The aim of this study was to describe functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) presented in a tertiary medical center, characteristics of patients and results of the diagnostic work-up together with an outcome during the follow up.

Methods:

This was a retrospective, single center, observational study including all patients who were diagnosed with FGID based on Rome III criteria from January to December 2015 in tertiary medical center.

Results:

Overall 294 children were included (mean age, 8.9 years [range, 1-18 years]; 165 females). Majority had functional constipation (35.4%), followed by functional abdominal pain (30.6%), irritable bowel syndrome (17.0%), functional dyspepsia (12.6%), functional nausea (3.4%) and abdominal migraine (1.0%). Regression model found that only significant factor associated with improvement of symptoms is the establishment of the functional diagnosis at the first visit (hazard ratio, 2.163; 95% confidence inverval, 1.029-4.544). There was no association between improvement of symptoms and presence of alarm signs/symptoms (weight loss, nocturnal symptoms and severe vomiting) at diagnosis. Furthermore, in pain symptoms (functional abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia) no treatment positively correlated with pain improvement.

Conclusion:

Regardless of the initial diagnosis of FGID, positive diagnosis at the first visit increases a chance for resolution of symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal pain; Child; Constipation; Dyspepsia

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