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Am J Prev Med. 2018 Dec;55(6):839-847. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.020. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Sexual Minority Status and Adolescent Eating Behaviors, Physical Activity, and Weight Status.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: jeremy.luk@nih.gov.
2
Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland; Department of Economics and Business, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado.
3
Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland; Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study examined sexual orientation differences in eating behaviors, physical activity, and weight status among adolescents in the U.S. Moreover, this study tested whether parental and peer influences contribute to sexual orientation disparities in adolescent eating behaviors, physical activity, BMI, and examined disparities in weight misperception.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data were from 1,926 adolescents who participated in the NEXT Generation Health Study in 2010-2011. Linear and multinomial logistic regressions conducted in 2017-2018 were used to test disparities and interactions with social influences.

RESULTS:

Relative to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority males and females consumed fruits and vegetables more frequently; sexual minority males engaged in less frequent physical activity; and sexual minority females were more likely to be overweight, perceive themselves as overweight, and to overestimate their weight. High parental expectation for physical activity was associated with more frequent vigorous physical activity among heterosexual adolescents, but less frequent vigorous physical activity among sexual minority males. Exercising with a same-sex peer buffered against the risk of higher BMI among sexual minority females.

CONCLUSIONS:

Parental and peer influences may serve as potential intervention targets to reduce disparities in weight-related behaviors. Longitudinal research is needed to understand the consequences of weight misperception among sexual minority females.

PMID:
30344031
PMCID:
PMC6296226
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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