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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2018 Dec;146:111-118. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2018.10.008. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Microbiome and diabetes: Where are we now?

Author information

1
Evangelismos General Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: natalia.vallianou@hotmail.com.
2
Evangelismos General Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

Alterations in the diversity or structure of gut microbiota known as dysbiosis, may affect metabolic activities, resulting in metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. The development of more sophisticated methods, such as metagenomics sequencing, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, microarrays and fluorescence in situ hybridization, has expanded our knowledge on gut microbiome. Dysbiosis has been related to increased plasma concentrations of gut microbiota-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which triggers the production of a variety of cytokines and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. Metabolomics have demonstrated that butyrate and propionate suppress weight gain in mice with high fat diet-induced obesity, and acetate has been proven to reduce food intake in healthy mice. The role of prebiotics, probiotics, genetically modified bacteria and fecal microbiota transplantation, as potential therapeutic challenges for type 2 diabetes will be discussed in this review.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Microbiome; Microbiota; Prebiotics; Probiotics

PMID:
30342053
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2018.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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