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Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2019 Jun;19(3):459-476. doi: 10.3758/s13415-018-00649-0.

Deconstructing value-based decision making via temporally selective manipulation of neural activity: Insights from rodent models.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida College of Medicine, P.O. Box 100256, Gainesville, FL, 32610-0256, USA. orsini@ufl.edu.
2
Center for Addiction Research and Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA. orsini@ufl.edu.
3
Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida College of Medicine, P.O. Box 100256, Gainesville, FL, 32610-0256, USA.
5
Center for Addiction Research and Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA.

Abstract

The ability to choose among options that differ in their rewards and costs (value-based decision making) has long been a topic of interest for neuroscientists, psychologists, and economists alike. This is likely because this is a cognitive process in which all animals (including humans) engage on a daily basis, be it routine (which road to take to work) or consequential (which graduate school to attend). Studies of value-based decision making (particularly at the preclinical level) often treat it as a uniform process. The results of such studies have been invaluable for our understanding of the brain substrates and neurochemical systems that contribute to decision making involving a range of different rewards and costs. Value-based decision making is not a unitary process, however, but is instead composed of distinct cognitive operations that function in concert to guide choice behavior. Within this conceptual framework, it is therefore important to consider that the known neural substrates supporting decision making may contribute to temporally distinct and dissociable components of the decision process. This review will describe this approach for investigating decision making, drawing from published studies that have used techniques that allow temporal dissection of the decision process, with an emphasis on the literature in animal models. The review will conclude with a discussion of the implications of this work for understanding pathological conditions that are characterized by impaired decision making.

KEYWORDS:

Amygdala; Decision making; Dopamine; Optogenetics; Prefrontal cortex

PMID:
30341621
PMCID:
PMC6472996
[Available on 2020-06-01]
DOI:
10.3758/s13415-018-00649-0

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