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Microb Ecol. 2018 Oct 19. doi: 10.1007/s00248-018-1270-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Comamonadaceae OTU as a Remnant of an Ancient Microbial Community in Sulfidic Waters.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Center for Modern Technologies, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Wilenska 4, 87-100, Toruń, Poland. dejasikora@umk.pl.
2
Department of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland. dejasikora@umk.pl.
3
Interdisciplinary Center for Modern Technologies, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Wilenska 4, 87-100, Toruń, Poland.
4
Chair of Plant Physiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland.
5
Department of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland.
6
Department of Geology and Hydrogeology, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland.
7
Department of Food Analysis and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Engineering, UTP University of Science and Technology, Seminaryjna 3, 85-326, Bydgoszcz, Poland.
8
Department of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland. walczak@umk.pl.

Abstract

Intraterrestrial waters harbor microbial communities being extensively studied to understand microbial processes underlying subsurface ecosystem functioning. This paper provides the results of an investigation on the microbiomes of unique, subsurface sulfidic waters associated with Upper Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Miocene sediments. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to reveal the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities in water samples differing in sulfide content (20-960 mg/dm3), salinity (1.3-3.2%), and depth of extraction (60-660 m below ground level). Composition of the bacterial communities strongly varied across the samples; however, the bacteria participating in the sulfur cycle were common in all sulfidic waters. The shallowest borehole water (60 m bgl) was dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria (Sulfurimonas, Sulfurovum). In the waters collected from greater depths (148-300 m bgl), the prevalence of Betaproteobacteria (Comamonadaceae) and sulfate/sulfur-reducing Deltaproteobacteria (Desulfopila, Desulfomicrobium, MSBL7) was observed. Sulfate reducers (members of Clostridia: Candidatus Desulforudis) were the most abundant bacteria in the deepest borehole water (660 m bgl). Out of 850 bacterial OTUs, only one, affiliated with the Comamonadaceae family, was found abundant (> 1% of total bacterial sequences) in all samples. Contribution of Archaea to the whole microbial communities was lower than 0.5%. Archaeal communities did not differ across the samples and they consisted of Halobacteriaceae. Out of 372 archaeal OTUs, five, belonging to the four genera Natronomonas, Halorubrum, Halobellus, and Halorhabdus, were the most numerous.

KEYWORDS:

Intraterrestrial microbiome; Microbial diversity; Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB); Sulfidic waters; Sulfur cycle; Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB)

PMID:
30341500
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-018-1270-5

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