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Neurosci Lett. 2018 Oct 16:133887. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2018.10.032. [Epub ahead of print]

Cathodal tDCS on the motor area decreases the tactile threshold of the distal pulp of the hallux.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Healthcare, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki, 300-0394, Japan. Electronic address: yamamoto-s@umin.ac.jp.
2
Center for Medical Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki, 300-0394, Japan; Department of Cognitive Behavioral Physiology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Healthcare, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki, 300-0394, Japan.
4
Center for Medical Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki, 300-0394, Japan.

Abstract

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been reported to modulate cortical excitability. Most studies on this topic addressed the modulation effects of tDCS on the upper extremities. Foot-sole tactile sensation is essential to gait, but little is known about the effect of tDCS on sensory function in the foot area. Here we administered tDCS to 10 healthy adults, and we observed that the modulation effects of cathodal tDCS on the left motor area led to a decrease in the tactile threshold of the left center of the distal pulp of the hallux. This effect was not observed in the sham condition. In addition, the subjects' vigilance levels were not changed between before and after the tDCS. These results suggest that sensation on the sole of the left foot could be modulated by cathodal tDCS on the left motor area.

KEYWORDS:

Plantar sensation; Tactile threshold; Transcranial direct current stimulation

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