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Sci Rep. 2018 Oct 18;8(1):15450. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-33511-x.

Epidemiology and Clinical Profile of Cutaneous Warts in Chinese College Students: A Cross-Sectional and Follow-Up Study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, 306 Hospital of PLA, Beijing, 100101, China.
2
Institute of Reproductive and Child Health/Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191, China.
3
Department of Dermatology, The Second People's Hospital of Wuqing, Tianjin, 301700, China.
4
Department of Dermatology, The Third People's Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, 528000, China.
5
Department of Dermatology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853, China.
6
Department of Dermatology, 306 Hospital of PLA, Beijing, 100101, China. lvshichao@sina.com.

Abstract

In this study, the hands and feet of 15,384 undergraduate and postgraduate students in 3 colleges in Beijing were examined for the presence of cutaneous warts at college-entry, and those diagnosed with warts were followed up 2-3 years later. We identified totally 215 (1.4%; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6%) students with warts. The prevalence was significantly higher in male than in female students (2.0% vs. 0.9%, P < 0.0001). Of the 215 patients, 66.9% and 62.1% had only one wart and 98.3% and 93.2% had warts <1 cm in diameter, on the hands and feet, respectively. Of the 130 patients with a follow-up visit, 78 did not receive any treatment (44 recovered within 2 years). Patients aged 21-25 compared to those aged ≤20 were more likely to be free of warts (hazard ratio = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.07-2.89), while lower father's education (hazard ratio = 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.98) and poor sleep quality (hazard ratio = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.18-0.92) decreased the likelihood of resolution. The prevalence of warts is 1.4% in college students. The majority of patients have warts <1 cm and approximately 2/3 patients has one wart. Slightly over half of patients recover spontaneously within 2 years. Patients' age, sleep quality, and paternal education may affect the resolution.

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