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Br J Sports Med. 2018 Nov;52(21):1347-1356. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099399.

Effectiveness of exercise interventions in the prevention of excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Human Kinetics, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada.
2
R Samuel McLaughlin Foundation - Exercise and Pregnancy Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Children's Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
3
Program for Pregnancy and Postpartum Health, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, Alberta Diabetes InstituteUniversity of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
4
Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, UK.
5
Department of Anatomy, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Canada.
6
Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
7
School of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
8
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
9
Independent Researcher, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
10
Clinical Research Unit, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
11
John W Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
12
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
13
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
14
Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Gestational weight gain (GWG) has been identified as a critical modifier of maternal and fetal health. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to examine the relationship between prenatal exercise, GWG and postpartum weight retention (PPWR).

DESIGN:

Systematic review with random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression. Online databases were searched up to 6 January 2017.

STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

Studies of all designs in English, Spanish or French were eligible (except case studies and reviews) if they contained information on the population (pregnant women without contraindication to exercise), intervention (frequency, intensity, duration, volume or type of exercise, alone ["exercise-only"] or in combination with other intervention components [eg, dietary; "exercise + co-intervention"]), comparator (no exercise or different frequency, intensity, duration, volume or type of exercise) and outcomes (GWG, excessive GWG (EGWG), inadequate GWG (IGWG) or PPWR).

RESULTS:

Eighty-four unique studies (n=21 530) were included. 'Low' to 'moderate' quality evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) showed that exercise-only interventions decreased total GWG (n=5819; -0.9 kg, 95% CI -1.23 to -0.57 kg, I2=52%) and PPWR (n=420; -0.92 kg, 95% CI -1.84 to 0.00 kg, I2=0%) and reduced the odds of EGWG (n=3519; OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.80, I2=12%) compared with no exercise. 'High' quality evidence indicated higher odds of IGWG with prenatal exercise-only (n=1628; OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.67, I2=0%) compared with no exercise.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prenatal exercise reduced the odds of EGWG and PPWR but increased the risk of IGWG. However, the latter result should be interpreted with caution because it was based on a limited number of studies (five RCTs).

KEYWORDS:

body weight regulation; exercise; pregnancy

PMID:
30337461
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2018-099399
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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