Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lancet Child Adolesc Health. 2018 Nov;2(11):832-838. doi: 10.1016/S2352-4642(18)30270-0.

Principles for provision of integrated complex care for children across the acute-community interface in Europe.

Author information

1
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: brennerm@tcd.ie.
2
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
3
Department of Health and Care Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Harstad, Norway.
4
Lausanne University Medical Centre, Lausanne, Switzerland.
5
Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, Italian National Research Council, Rome, Italy.
6
School of Population Sciences and Health Services Research, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.
7
Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
8
Evelina London Children's Healthcare, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust, London.
9
Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland.
10
Department of Medicine and Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, London, UK.
12
Section of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, London, UK.

Abstract

This Viewpoint presents and discusses the development of the first core principles and standards for effective, personalised care of children living with complex care needs in Europe. These principles and standards emerged from an analysis of data gathered on several areas, including the integration of care for the child at the acute-community interface, the referral-discharge interface, the social care interface, nursing preparedness for practice, and experiences of the child and family. The three main principles, underpinned by a child-centric approach, are access to care, co-creation of care, and effective integrated governance. Collectively, the principles and standards offer a means to benchmark existing services for children living with complex care needs, to influence policy in relation to service delivery for these children, and to provide a suite of indicators with which to assess future service developments in this area.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center