Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2018 Oct 18. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201806-1053PP. [Epub ahead of print]

Moving Toward Tuberculosis Elimination: Critical Issues for Research in Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Tuberculosis Infection.

Author information

1
Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States ; Salmaan_Keshavjee@hms.harvard.edu.
2
Indus Hospital, 194816, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan.
3
University of California, San Francisco, Medicine, San Francisco, California, United States.
4
John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States.
5
Colorado State University College of Health and Human Sciences, 306616, Fort Collins, Colorado, United States.
6
McGill University, Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
University of Nebraska Medical Center, 12284, Omaha, Nebraska, United States.
8
South African Medical Research Council, 59097, Tygerberg, South Africa.
9
Desmond Tutu TB Centre, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health,, Cape Town, South Africa.
10
National Lung Hospital and the National TB Program, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
11
Imperial College London, Paediatrics, London, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
12
University of the Witwatersrand Faculty of Health Sciences, 37708, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa.
13
Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, biochemistry, Chandigarh, India.
14
PVAMC, OHSU, Pulmonary & CCM, Portland, Oregon, United States.
15
Oregon Health & Science University, Pediatrics, Portland, Oregon, United States.
16
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pediatrics, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States.
17
Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Patient Care, 283434, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
18
University of Cape Town Faculty of Health Sciences, 63726, Department of Medicine, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa.
19
University of Liverpool Institute of Translational Medicine, 232227, Liverpool, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
20
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 35037, Bethesda, Maryland, United States.
21
Emory University, 1371, Emory Vaccine Center, Atlanta, Georgia, United States.
22
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
23
The State University of New Jersey, Department of Medicine, Center for Emerging Pathogens, Newark, New Jersey, United States.
24
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
25
Desmond Tutu TB Centre, Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
26
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
27
Nebraska Medicine, 21039, Omaha, Nebraska, United States.
28
Duke University School of Medicine, 12277, Durham, North Carolina, United States.
29
PD Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, 29537, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
30
University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa.
31
Division of AIDS/NIAID/NIH/DHHS, Tuberculosis Clinical Research Branch, Bethesda, Maryland, United States.
32
University of California San Francisco, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, San Francisco, California, United States.

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) has surpassed HIV to become the leading infectious killer of adults globally, causing almost 2 million deaths annually. Although this airborne disease has been treatable since 1948, global rates of TB have dropped less than two percent per year; an estimated 10 million incident cases continue to occur annually, including one million in children. While transmission of active disease is an important driver of the epidemic, the seedbed that feeds the epidemic is the more than two billion people estimated to have TB infection, five to ten percent of whom will progress to active disease during their lifetime. While any successful strategy aimed at TB elimination needs to address this reservoir of TB infection worldwide, much remains to be understood about host and pathogen factors that can be used to identify increased risk for progression to disease, and intervened upon to prevent progression from occurring. The Division of AIDS of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, USA, and the Harvard Medical School Center for Global Health Delivery-Dubai convened a group of scientists and stakeholders on September 28 and 29, 2017, to address knowledge gaps that affect our ability to rapidly find and treat individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis who are most likely to progress to active disease. The meeting identified a number of efforts underway to address this important gap in the collective ability to stop the global TB epidemic. Here, we review and outline the priority areas for research, diagnosis and treatment of TB infection that emerged from the meeting (Table 1), building on recent reviews in this area.

PMID:
30335466
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201806-1053PP

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center