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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019 Jan;28(1):76-82. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0654. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Body Fatness, Adipose Tissue Compartments, and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: The ColoCare Study.

Author information

1
Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah.
2
Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
3
Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
7
Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
8
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.
9
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
10
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
11
Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah. neli.ulrich@hci.utah.edu.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adiposity has been linked to both risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer; however, the impact of different fat areas [visceral (VFA) vs. subcutaneous fat area (SFA)] is unclear. We investigated associations between adiposity and biomarkers of inflammation and angiogenesis among patients with colorectal cancer.

METHODS:

Preoperative serum samples and computed tomography scans were obtained from 188 patients diagnosed with primary invasive stage I-IV colorectal cancer enrolled in the ColoCare Study. Adiposity was assessed by area-based quantification of VFA, SFA, and VFA:SFA ratio on spinal levels L3/L4 and L4/L5. Circulating levels of inflammation (CRP, SAA, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1) and angiogenesis (VEGF-A and VEGF-D) were assessed from patient sera on the Meso Scale Discovery platform. Partial correlations and regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, and tumor stage, were performed.

RESULTS:

VFA was moderately correlated with CRP and SAA (CRP: L3/L4 and L4/L5:r = 0.21, P = 0.01; SAA: L3/L4:r = 0.17, P = 0.04). The correlation between SFA and the measured biomarkers were weak (r ≤ 0.13, not significant). The ratio of VFA:SFA at L3/L4 was moderately correlated with VEGF-A (r = 0.28, P = 0.0008) and SAA (r = 0.24, P = 0.006), and less so with CRP (r = 0.18, P = 0.04) and sICAM-1 (r = 0.18, P = 0.04). Similar correlations were found for the VFA:SFA ratio at L4/L5.

CONCLUSIONS:

We observed an association between visceral adiposity and biomarkers of inflammation and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer. In particular, the VFA:SFA ratio was correlated with circulating levels of the proangiogenic biomarker VEGF-A.

IMPACT:

Our findings support a direct association of visceral adipose tissue with inflammatory and angiogenic processes, which play fundamental roles in the development and progression of colorectal cancer.

PMID:
30333223
PMCID:
PMC6324954
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0654

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