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Platelets. 2018 Oct 17:1-7. doi: 10.1080/09537104.2018.1529300. [Epub ahead of print]

A novel germline mutation in GP1BA gene N-terminal domain in monoallelic Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

Author information

1
a Department of Internal Medicine- Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Brno and Faculty of Medicine , Masaryk University , Brno , Czech Republic.
2
b Central European Institute of Technology , Masaryk University , Brno , Czech Republic.
3
c Department of Clinical Hematology , University Hospital Brno , Brno , Czech Republic.
4
d Department of Laboratory Methods, Faculty of Medicine , Masaryk University , Brno , Czech Republic.
5
e Outpatient Ward for Hematology and Internal Medicine , Zlín , Czech Republic.

Abstract

Mutations in the GP1BA gene have been associated with platelet-type von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome. Here, we report a novel GP1BA mutation in a family with autosomal dominant macrothrombocytopenia and mild bleeding. We performed analyses of seven family members. Using whole-exome sequencing of germline DNA samples, we identified a heterozygous single-nucleotide change in GP1BA (exone2:c.176T>G), encoding a p.Leu59Arg substitution in the N-terminal domain, segregating with macrothrombocytopenia. This variant has not been previously reported. We also analysed the structure of the detected sequence variant in silico. In particular, we used the crystal structure of the human platelet receptor GP Ibα N-terminal domain. Replacement of aliphatic amino-acid Leu 59 with charged, polar and larger arginine probably disrupts the protein structure. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, a family history of mild bleeding episodes, aggregation pattern in affected individuals together with evidence of mutation occurring in part of the GP1BA gene encoding the leucine-rich repeat region suggest a novel variant causing monoallelic Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Autosomal dominant variant; GP1BA; Inherited thrombocytopenia; monoallelic Bernard-Soulier syndrome

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