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World J Pediatr. 2018 Dec;14(6):570-575. doi: 10.1007/s12519-018-0188-9. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Characteristics and outcome of impacted button batteries among young children less than 7 years of age in China: a retrospective analysis of 116 cases.

Author information

1
Department of ENT, Wuhan Children's Hospital (Wuhan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital), Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430016, China.
2
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Wuhan Children's Hospital (Wuhan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital), Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 100 Jiangan District, Wuhan 430016, China. supermao2008@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ingestion of button batteries occurs in about ten persons per one million persons each year, with most of them children, and one in every 1000 battery ingestions leads to serious injuries. This study aimed to describe the clinical features and outcome of ingestion or inhalation of button batteries in children spanning a decade from January, 2006 to December, 2016 at a tertiary care hospital.

METHODS:

We reviewed the clinical records of children who sought treatment for inhaled or ingested button batteries at our hospital during the study period. Data on gender, age, time from ingestion to treatment, site of impaction, imaging findings, and outcomes were retrieved and analyzed.

RESULTS:

We identified 116 pediatric cases of ingestion or inhalation of button batteries. Their mean age was 26 months. The time from ingestion or inhalation of button batteries to treatment was 0.5 hours to 2 weeks. Ninety-seven (83.6%) button batteries were located in the nasal cavity, 13 (11.2%) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract including 6 in the esophagus, and 7 in the stomach and lower GI tract, and 6 (5.2%) in the auditory tract. Twenty-one (21.6%) children with nasal button batteries had preoperative septal perforations and one (1.0%) had postoperative septal perforation. One child with esophageal button battery developed esophageal stricture and one died of sudden cardiac arrest perioperatively. One child had auditory damages in the right tympanic membrane and ossicles.

CONCLUSIONS:

Inhalation or ingestion may occur in the nasal cavities, the esophagus and GI tract and the auditory tract. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are required for a satisfactory outcome and ingested or inhaled button batteries require different treatment protocols.

KEYWORDS:

Auditory tract; Button battery; Children; Esophagus; Foreign body; Ingestion; Inhalation; Nasal cavities; Removal

PMID:
30328588
DOI:
10.1007/s12519-018-0188-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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