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Support Care Cancer. 2019 May;27(5):1951-1960. doi: 10.1007/s00520-018-4507-4. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Evaluation of an online communication skills training programme for oncology nurses working with patients from minority backgrounds.

Author information

1
Psychosocial Research Group, Prince of Wales Clinical School, The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Level 4, C25 Lowy Building, UNSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. rajneesh.kaur@unsw.edu.au.
2
Psychosocial Research Group, Prince of Wales Clinical School, The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Level 4, C25 Lowy Building, UNSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.
3
School of Social Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney (UNSW), Sydney, Australia.
4
South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
5
Cancer Institute NSW, Sydney, Australia.
6
Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
7
Centre for Oncology Education and Research Translation, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia.
8
Psycho-Oncology Co-Operative Research Group, Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-Based Decision-Making, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
9
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia.
10
Multicultural Health Service, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
11
Cancer Council Australia, Sydney, Australia.
12
Charles Perkins Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
13
School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
14
Prince of Wales Clinical School and Nelune Cancer Centre, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to develop and assess the feasibility of an online communication skills training intervention to increase cultural competence amongst oncology nurses working with individuals from minority backgrounds.

METHODS:

The intervention provided examples of communication strategies using vignette-based, professionally produced videos, developed through an iterative process with input from a large multidisciplinary team. Fifty-three oncology nurses completed all three questionnaires at baseline, within 2 weeks and then 3 months after accessing the programme.

RESULTS:

The online intervention was well received by the majority of participants, and was endorsed as clearly presented, informative, relevant and useful by more than 90% of participants. Eighty-seven percent of participants reported increased confidence in communicating with patients via an interpreter, and 93% agreed that skills they gained would be useful in providing better patient care. Participants reported significant improvements in practice while interacting with people with limited English proficiency 2 weeks and 3 months after accessing the website (X2 = 13.66, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

This online communication training programme can now be tested for its utility in improving patient care for oncology nurses working with patients from minority backgrounds.

KEYWORDS:

Communication skills; Minority backgrounds; Oncology; Oncology nurses; Online training

PMID:
30327877
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-018-4507-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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