Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Oct 16. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0331-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Irritable bowel syndrome: associations between FODMAPS intake, problematic foods, adiposity, and gastrointestinal symptoms.

Author information

1
School of Applied Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 1300 Pedro Zaccaria Street, 13484350, Limeira, Sao Paulo, Brazil. solarisabela@hotmail.com.
2
School of Applied Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 1300 Pedro Zaccaria Street, 13484350, Limeira, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Brazil.
5
Nutrition Service of Medical Specialties Clinic, Limeira, Brazil.

Abstract

This study investigated the association between fermentable oligo-di-mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) intake, problematic foods, body adiposity, and gastrointestinal symptoms in 44 women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Around 84% reported to have excluded some food from their diet. Adiposity was not associated with the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms and IBS severity. Controlling for BMI, there were significant correlations between number of problematic foods versus waist circumference (r = 0.306; p = 0.049) and protein intake (r = -0.378; p = 0.014). The IBS severity correlated to the carbohydrate intake (r = -0.320; p = 0.039). Patients with diarrhea demonstrated statistical tendency to restrict the intake of fat (p = 0.058), free fructose (p = 0.07), and oligosaccharides (p = 0.051). Patients with mucus in the stool had higher lactose intake (p = 0.025). The number of food considered problematic was higher for patients who reported stomach burning (p = 0.0001). Associations among adiposity, gastrointestinal symptoms, problematic food, and FODMAPs were identified and reaffirm the role of individualized nutritional treatment in the management of IBS.

PMID:
30327493
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0331-7

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center