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Clin Rehabil. 2019 Mar;33(3):516-523. doi: 10.1177/0269215518806563. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Effects of robot-(Morning Walk®) assisted gait training for patients after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
1 Department of Rehabilitation medicine, Asan medical center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
3
3 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE::

To investigate the effects of Morning Walk®-assisted gait training for patients with stroke.

DESIGN::

Prospective randomized controlled trial.

SETTING::

Three hospital rehabilitation departments (two tertiary and one secondary).

PATIENTS::

We enrolled 58 patients with hemiparesis following a first-time stroke within the preceding year and with Functional Ambulation Category scores ⩾2.

INTERVENTION::

The patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: 30 minutes of training with Morning Walk®, a lower limb rehabilitation robot, plus 1 hour of conventional physiotherapy (Morning Walk® group; n = 28); or 1.5 hour of conventional physiotherapy (control group; n = 30). All received treatment five times per week for three weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS::

The primary outcomes were walking ability, assessed using the Functional Ambulation Category scale, and lower limb function, assessed using the Motricity Index-Lower. Secondary outcomes included the 10 Meter Walk Test, Modified Barthel Index, Rivermead Mobility Index, and Berg Balance Scale scores.

RESULTS::

A total of 10 patients were lost to follow-up, leaving a cohort of 48 for the final analyses. After training, all outcome measures significantly improved in both groups. In Motricity Index-Lower of the affected limb, the Morning Walk® group (∆mean ± SD; 19.68 ± 14.06) showed greater improvement ( p = .034) than the control group (∆mean ± SD; 11.70 ± 10.65). And Berg Balance Scale scores improved more ( p = .047) in the Morning Walk® group (∆mean ± SD; 14.36 ± 9.01) than the control group (∆mean ± SD; 9.65 ± 8.14).

CONCLUSION::

Compared with conventional physiotherapy alone, our results suggest that voluntary strength and balance of stroke patients with hemiparesis might be improved with Morning Walk®-assisted gait training combined with conventional physiotherapy.

KEYWORDS:

Stroke; gait; neurological rehabilitation; robotics

PMID:
30326747
DOI:
10.1177/0269215518806563

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