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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2018;46(3-4):193-206. doi: 10.1159/000492962. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Diabetes, but Not Hypertension and Obesity, Is Associated with Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Operative Intensive Care Medicine (CCM, CVK), Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
2
Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Berlin, Germany.
3
Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), Berlin, Germanyinsa.feinkohl@mdc-berlin.de.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
5
Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
6
Anaestesiafdelingen, Næstved Sygehus, Næstved, Denmark.
7
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
8
Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), Berlin, Germany.
9
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
10
MDC/BIH Biobank, Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), and Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Berlin, Germany.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Older people undergoing surgery are at risk of developing postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), but little is known of risk factors predisposing patients to POCD. Our objective was to estimate the risk of POCD associated with exposure to preoperative diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

METHODS:

Original data from 3 randomised controlled trials (OCTOPUS, DECS, SuDoCo) were obtained for secondary analysis on diabetes, hypertension, baseline blood pressure, obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2), and BMI as risk factors for POCD in multiple logistic regression models. Risk estimates were pooled across the 3 studies.

RESULTS:

Analyses totalled 1,034 patients. POCD occurred in 5.2% of patients in DECS, in 9.4% in SuDoCo, and in 32.1% of patients in OCTOPUS. After adjustment for age, sex, surgery type, randomisation, obesity, and hypertension, diabetes was associated with a 1.84-fold increased risk of POCD (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.14, 2.97; p = 0.01). Obesity, BMI, hypertension, and baseline blood pressure were each not associated with POCD in fully adjusted models (all p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Diabetes, but not obesity or hypertension, is associated with increased POCD risk. Consideration of diabetes status may be helpful for risk assessment of surgical patients.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Hypertension; Obesity; Postoperative cognitive dysfunction

PMID:
30326480
DOI:
10.1159/000492962

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