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Neuroimage. 2019 Jan 15;185:85-95. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.10.010. Epub 2018 Oct 13.

A 3D population-based brain atlas of the mouse lemur primate with examples of applications in aging studies and comparative anatomy.

Author information

1
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 9199, Neurodegenerative Diseases Laboratory, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives (CEA), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Institut François Jacob, MIRCen, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
2
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 9199, Neurodegenerative Diseases Laboratory, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives (CEA), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Institut François Jacob, MIRCen, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Inserm, Inserm UMR-S U1237, Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, GIP Cyceron, Caen, France; Normandie University, UNICAEN, EPHE, INSERM, U1077, CHU de Caen, Neuropsychologie et Imagerie de la Mémoire Humaine, 14000, Caen, France.
3
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 9199, Neurodegenerative Diseases Laboratory, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives (CEA), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Institut François Jacob, MIRCen, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France. Electronic address: marc.dhenain@cea.fr.
4
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 9199, Neurodegenerative Diseases Laboratory, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives (CEA), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Institut François Jacob, MIRCen, 18 Route du Panorama, F-92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France; Laboratoire de Psychopathologie et de Neuropsychologie, EA 2027, Université Paris 8, 2 Rue de la, Liberté, 93000, St Denis, France.

Abstract

The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a small prosimian of growing interest for studies of primate biology and evolution, and notably as a model organism of brain aging. As brain atlases are essential tools for brain investigation, the objective of the current work was to create the first 3D digital atlas of the mouse lemur brain. For this, a template image was constructed from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 34 animals. This template was then manually segmented into 40 cortical, 74 subcortical and 6 cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) regions. Additionally, we generated probability maps of gray matter, white matter and CSF. The template, manual segmentation and probability maps, as well as imaging tools used to create and manipulate the template, can all be freely downloaded. The atlas was first used to automatically assess regional age-associated cerebral atrophy in a cohort of mouse lemurs previously studied by voxel based morphometry (VBM). Results based on the atlas were in good agreement with the VBM ones, showing age-associated atrophy in the same brain regions such as the insular, parietal or occipital cortices as well as the thalamus or hypothalamus. The atlas was also used as a tool for comparative neuroanatomy. To begin with, we compared measurements of brain regions in our MRI data with histology-based measures from a reference article largely used in previous comparative neuroanatomy studies. We found large discrepancies between our MRI-based data and those of the reference histology-based article. Next, regional brain volumes were compared amongst the mouse lemur and several other mammalian species where high quality volumetric MRI brain atlases were available, including rodents (mouse, rat) and primates (marmoset, macaque, and human). Unlike those based on histological atlases, measures from MRI atlases indicated similar cortical to cerebral volume indices in all primates, including in mouse lemurs, and lower values in mice. On the other hand, white matter to cerebral volume index increased from rodents to small primates (mouse lemurs and marmosets) to macaque, reaching their highest values in humans.

KEYWORDS:

Atlas; Cerebral atrophy; Comparative anatomy; MRI; Mouse lemur; Template

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