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J Appl Microbiol. 2018 Oct 16. doi: 10.1111/jam.14132. [Epub ahead of print]

Relation between broiler and human Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated in Belgium from 2011 to 2013.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Preservation, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.
2
National Reference Laboratory for Campylobacter, Sciensano, Scientific Service Foodborne Pathogens, Brussels, Belgium.
3
USDA, ARS, WRRC, Produce Safety and Microbiology, Albany, CA, USA.
4
Section Quality of Laboratories, Sciensano, Brussels, Belgium.
5
National Reference Center for Campylobacter, Saint Pierre University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium.
6
Department of Microbiology, LHUB-ULB, Pôle Hospitalier Universitaire de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
7
Department of Molecular Diagnosis, LHUB-ULB, Pôle Hospitalier Universitaire de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
8
Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.
9
Center for Environmental Health and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

AIMS:

This study inquires the relationship between Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler meat carcasses (n = 97) and human clinical samples (n = 72) in Belgium, from 2011 to 2013.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The evaluation of the relation was based on the characteristics determined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alone and combined with flagellin gene A restriction fragment length polymorphism (flaA-RFLP) typing, antibiotic microbiological resistance profiling (AMRp), lipooligosaccharide class typing or virulence gene profiling (Vp). Clusters containing both human and broiler meat strains were more common when MLST was used alone, followed by MLST/flaA-RFLP and then by MLST/AMRp. More logical chronologically relations broiler-human were obtained for MLST/flaA-RFLP, then for MLST, and finally for MLST/AMRp: i.e. the isolates would first be detected in the broiler meat and at the same time or later in humans.

CONCLUSIONS:

In several cases, the C. jejuni strains isolated from the consumed broiler meat and from the campylobacteriosis case had the same profile, according to the used typing methods. The circulating Campylobacter strains appear to have remained the same from 2011 till 2013 in Belgium.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

This study corroborates previously published data from Belgium that suggest a strong correlation between C. jejuni strains isolated from broiler meat and from campylobacteriosis patients.

KEYWORDS:

Campylobacter ; Belgium; broiler; human; typing

PMID:
30326177
DOI:
10.1111/jam.14132

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