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Radiology. 2019 Jan;290(1):207-215. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2018181353. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Reporting Standards for Chronic Pancreatitis by Using CT, MRI, and MR Cholangiopancreatography: The Consortium for the Study of Chronic Pancreatitis, Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer.

Author information

1
From the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences (T.T.) and Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology (E.L.F.), Indiana University School of Medicine, 550 N University Blvd, Suite 0663, Indianapolis, Ind 46202; Department of Radiology (Z.K.S.) and Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition (D.L.C.), Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Radiology (N.T., S.K.V.) and Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (M.T.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Fla (J.R.G.); Department of Radiology and Division of Body MRI, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif (S.T.C.); Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, Calif (W.P.); Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pa (D.Y.); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pa (A.K.D.).

Abstract

Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas with clinical manifestations ranging from abdominal pain, acute pancreatitis, exocrine and/or endocrine dysfunction, and pancreatic cancer. There is a need for longitudinal studies in well-phenotyped patients to ascertain the utility of cross-sectional imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis for diagnosis and assessment of disease severity. CT and MR cholangiopancreatography are the most common cross-sectional imaging studies performed for the evaluation of chronic pancreatitis. Currently, there are no universal reporting standards for chronic pancreatitis. Several features of chronic pancreatitis are applied clinically, such as calcifications, parenchymal T1 signal changes, focal or diffuse gland atrophy, or irregular contour of the gland. Such findings have not been incorporated into standardized diagnostic criteria. There is also lack of consensus on quantification of disease severity in chronic pancreatitis, other than by using ductal features alone as described in the Cambridge classification. The Consortium for the Study of Chronic Pancreatitis, Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer (CPDPC) was established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Cancer Institute in 2015 to undertake collaborative studies on chronic pancreatitis, diabetes mellitus, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CPDPC investigators from the Adult Chronic Pancreatitis Working Group were tasked with development of a new consensus approach to reporting features of chronic pancreatitis aimed to standardize diagnosis and assessment of disease severity for clinical trials. This consensus statement presents and defines features of chronic pancreatitis along with recommended reporting metrics. © RSNA, 2018 Online supplemental material is available for this article. See also the editorial by Megibow in this issue.

PMID:
30325281
PMCID:
PMC6314625
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1148/radiol.2018181353

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