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Sleep Breath. 2018 Dec;22(4):1197-1205. doi: 10.1007/s11325-018-1734-3. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Persistent sleep disordered breathing after adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy: a long-term survey in a tertiary pediatric hospital.

Author information

1
Clinique d'orthodontie majeure, Faculté de médecine dentaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. juliacohenlevy@yahoo.fr.
2
Service d'Oto-Rhino-Laryngologie, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Canada.
3
Clinique d'orthodontie majeure, Faculté de médecine dentaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
4
Dentistry University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
5
Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the long-term prevalence of persistent sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children, after adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy, and to assess the relationship between baseline characteristics and persistent nocturnal symptoms.

METHODS:

The clinical charts of children operated for adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy in a tertiary hospital, between January 2000 and March 2016, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients who had signs of SDB prior to surgery received a six-question validated pediatric questionnaire, the Hierarchic Severity Clinical Scale (HSCS).

RESULTS:

A total of 4000 children showing SDB prior to surgery were selected out of 5809 (68.9%); 1176 parents returned the questionnaire (29.4%), with a mean age at surgery of 4.3 ± 2.2 and age at survey of 9.6 ± 3.6. Complete resolution of SDB was subjectively reported in 798 patients (67.9%), and mild SDB was suspected in 301 children (25.6%, HSCS > 0 with chronic snoring), while 77 (6.5%) had a HSCS > 2.72, suggesting persistent obstructive sleep apnea. In non-syndromic children, male sex, history of sole adenoidectomy, or sole tonsillectomy, and early age of surgery (< 2 years-old) were associated with higher HSCS scores (p < 0.05). Moreover, symptoms had a tendency to decrease from 1 to 6 years, re-occur at age 7-8, and also after 13, with boys reporting more severe symptoms, at a younger age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgical excision of lymphoid tissue to treat SDB in childhood seems to be effective in the long term in two-thirds of subjects, while partial surgeries, specific age groups and early surgery are more likely to have persistent or recurrent symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Adenoidectomy; Adenotonsillectomy; Child; Obstructive sleep apnea; Questionnaire; Sleep disordered breathing

PMID:
30324546
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-018-1734-3

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