Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Methods Mol Biol. 2019;1834:221-249. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-8669-9_16.

Drosophila melanogaster: A Valuable Genetic Model Organism to Elucidate the Biology of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

Author information

1
Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany.
2
Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany. knust@mpi-cbg.de.
3
Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany. hebbar@mpi-cbg.de.

Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a complex inherited disease. It is associated with mutations in a wide variety of genes with many different functions. These mutations impact the integrity of rod photoreceptors and ultimately result in the progressive degeneration of rods and cone photoreceptors in the retina, leading to complete blindness. A hallmark of this disease is the variable degree to which symptoms are manifest in patients. This is indicative of the influence of the environment, and/or of the distinct genetic makeup of the individual.The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has effectively proven to be a great model system to better understand interconnected genetic networks. UnravelingĀ genetic interactions and thereby different cellular processes is relatively easy because more than a century of research on flies has enabled the creation of sophisticated genetic tools to perturb gene function. A remarkable conservation of disease genes across evolution and the similarity of the general organization of the fly and vertebrate photoreceptor cell had prompted research on fly retinal degeneration. To date six fly modelsĀ for RP, including RP4, RP11, RP12, RP14, RP25, and RP26, have been established, and have provided useful information on RP disease biology. In this chapter, an outline of approaches and experimental specifications are described to enable utilizing or developing new fly models of RP.

KEYWORDS:

Cellular pathways; Drosophila melanogaster; Genetics; Retinal disease

PMID:
30324448
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-8669-9_16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center