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Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol. 2018 Jun;32(2):61-81. doi: 10.1016/j.bpa.2018.07.001. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

Pharmacogenomics, precision medicine, and implications for anesthesia care.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Room 656, 1542 Tulane Ave., New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. Electronic address: akaye@lsuhsc.edu.
2
VCU, Department of Anesthesiology, 1200 East Broad Street, 7th Floor, PO Box 980695, Richmond Virginia, 23298, USA. Electronic address: tmahakia@tulane.edu.
3
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA. Electronic address: aaronkaye44@yahoo.com.
4
Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. Electronic address: apham3@tulane.edu.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: bhart1@lsuhsc.edu.
6
Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: sgennu@lsuhsc.edu.
7
Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: ecorne@lsuhsc.edu.
8
Department of Anesthesiology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, 9212, USA. Electronic address: rodneyagabriel@alumni.ucsf.edu.
9
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Electronic address: rurman@bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

The study of how individual genetic differences, known as polymorphisms, change the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs is called pharmacogenomics. As the field of pharmacogenetics grows and continues to identify genetic polymorphisms, it is promising that the unmet need in this patient population may soon be addressed with personalized drug therapy based on the patient's genetic composition. Although encouraging, pharmacogenomic testing is underutilized in the United States and is often not covered by insurance companies. This manuscript describes the current state of precision medicine as it relates to perioperative care and how preoperative genomic analysis can help improve patient outcomes. This investigation also outlines future directions in this important and evolving field.

KEYWORDS:

anesthesiology; genomics; pain; personalized medicine; pharmacogenomics; polymorphism

PMID:
30322465
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpa.2018.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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