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J Clin Med. 2018 Oct 14;7(10). pii: E355. doi: 10.3390/jcm7100355.

Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutics for Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

Author information

1
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-0003 Japan. yuugot@gmail.com.
2
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan. yuugot@gmail.com.
3
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-0003 Japan. tkskdt@gmail.com.
4
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan. tkskdt@gmail.com.
5
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-0003 Japan. md986001@yahoo.co.jp.
6
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan. tochiya@ncc.go.jp.
7
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-0003 Japan. kkuwano@jikei.ac.jp.

Abstract

It is currently thought that extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, play an important autocrine/paracrine role in intercellular communication. EVs package proteins, mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), which have the ability to transfer biological information to recipient cells in the lungs. Depending on their origin, EVs fulfil different functions. EVs derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found to promote therapeutic activities that are comparable to MSCs themselves. Recent animal model-based studies suggest that MSC-derived EVs have significant potential as a novel alternative to whole-cell therapies. Compared to their parent cells, EVs may have a superior safety profile and can be stored without losing function. It has been observed that MSC-derived EVs suppress pro-inflammatory processes and reduce oxidative stress, pulmonary fibrosis and remodeling in a variety of in vivo inflammatory lung disease models by transferring their components. However, there remain significant challenges to translate this therapy to the clinic. From this view point, we will summarize recent studies on EVs produced by MSCs in preclinical experimental models of inflammatory lung diseases. We will also discuss the most relevant issues in bringing MSC-derived EV-based therapeutics to the clinic for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

KEYWORDS:

extracellular vesicles; inflammatory lung diseases; mesenchymal stem cells; microRNA

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