Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2019 Jan 1;138:18-40. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2018.10.007. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

External stimulus responsive inorganic nanomaterials for cancer theranostics.

Author information

1
Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe, 350-8585, Japan; Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585, Japan.
2
Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe, 350-8585, Japan.
3
Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe, 350-8585, Japan; Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585, Japan. Electronic address: maekawa@toyo.jp.
4
Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe, 350-8585, Japan; Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585, Japan. Electronic address: sakthi@toyo.jp.

Abstract

Cancer is a highly intelligent system of cells, that works together with the body to thrive and subsequently overwhelm the host in order for its survival. Therefore, treatment regimens should be equally competent to outsmart these cells. Unfortunately, it is not the case with current therapeutic practices, the reason why it is still one of the most deadly adversaries and an imposing challenge to healthcare practitioners and researchers alike. With rapid nanotechnological interventions in the medical arena, the amalgamation of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into a single platform, theranostics provides a never before experienced hope of enhancing diagnostic accuracy and therapeutic efficiency. Additionally, the ability of these nanotheranostic agents to perform their actions on-demand, i.e. can be controlled by external stimulus such as light, magnetic field, sound waves and radiation has cemented their position as next generation anti-cancer candidates. Numerous reports exist of such stimuli-responsive theranostic nanomaterials against cancer, but few have broken through to clinical trials, let alone clinical practice. This review sheds light on the pros and cons of a few such theranostic nanomaterials, especially inorganic nanomaterials which do not require any additional chemical moieties to initiate the stimulus. The review will primarily focus on preclinical and clinical trial approved theranostic agents alone, describing their success or failure in the respective stages.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Clinical trials; External stimulus; Inorganic nanoparticles; Theranostics

PMID:
30321621
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2018.10.007

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center