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PLoS One. 2018 Oct 15;13(10):e0205428. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205428. eCollection 2018.

Ocular motor cranial nerve palsy and increased risk of stroke in the general population.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether ocular motor cranial nerve (CN) palsy raises the risk of subsequent stroke in the general population.

METHODS:

We investigated the association between ocular motor CN palsy and occurrence of stroke using the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort database from 2002 to 2013. We included individuals aged ≥ 20 years on January 1st, 2004, and excluded those having any paralytic strabismus, disorders in binocular movement, diplopia and any cerebrovascular diseases before entering the cohort. Incident ocular motor CN palsy was identified by diagnostic codes for third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies. To determine the effect of incident ocular motor CN palsy on the occurrence of subsequent stroke, we used time-varying covariate Cox regression models. Model 1 included only incident third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies as a time-varying covariate. Model 2 included Model 1 and defined demographic information. Model 3 included Model 2, comorbidity, co-medication, and the Charlson index score.

RESULTS:

Among 727,689 individuals in the cohort, 1,633 patients developed ocular motor CN palsy and 17,657 patients suffered stroke. Cox regression models showed that development of ocular motor CN palsy was associated with an increased risk of subsequent stroke (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.65; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 3.74-5.80 in Model 1), and the results were consistent even after adjusting for demographic factors and confounders in Model 2 and 3. Men, older age, and individuals not living in Seoul/Incheon area were associated with an increased risk of stroke, while individuals with higher income were associated with decreased risk of stroke in both Model 2 and 3. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-based matching produced similar results in all three Models (HR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.55-2.46 in Model 1, HR = 1.91; 95% CI, 1.52-2.41 in Model 2, and HR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.06 in Model 3).

CONCLUSIONS:

The occurrence of ocular motor CN palsy is a significant risk factor of subsequent stroke even after adjusting for demographic factors and confounders in the general population. Physicians may need to educate patients with ocular motor CN palsy regarding the higher risk of future stroke.

PMID:
30321220
PMCID:
PMC6188901
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0205428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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