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Biomed Opt Express. 2018 Sep 7;9(10):4689-4701. doi: 10.1364/BOE.9.004689. eCollection 2018 Oct 1.

High-speed widefield photoacoustic microscopy of small-animal hemodynamics.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
2
Center for Perioperative Organ Protection (CPOP), Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
3
Caltech Optical Imaging Laboratory, Andrew and Peggy Cherng Department of Medical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.
5
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Tx 77843, USA.

Abstract

Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has become a popular tool in small-animal hemodynamic studies. However, previous OR-PAM techniques variously lacked a high imaging speed and/or a large field of view, impeding the study of highly dynamic physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over a large region of interest. Here we report a high-speed OR-PAM system with an ultra-wide field of view, enabled by an innovative water-immersible hexagon-mirror scanner. By driving the hexagon-mirror scanner with a high-precision DC motor, the new OR-PAM has achieved a cross-sectional frame rate of 900 Hz over a 12-mm scanning range, which is 3900 times faster than our previous motor-scanner-based system and 10 times faster than the MEMS-scanner-based system. Using this hexagon-scanner-based OR-PAM system, we have imaged epinephrine-induced vasoconstriction in the whole mouse ear and vascular reperfusion after ischemic stroke in the mouse cortex in vivo, with a high spatial resolution and high volumetric imaging speed. We expect that the hexagon-scanner-based OR-PAM system will become a powerful tool for small animal imaging where the hemodynamic responses over a large field of view are of interest.

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