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Med Gas Res. 2018 Sep 25;8(3):73-78. doi: 10.4103/2045-9912.241063. eCollection 2018 Jul-Sep.

Inhalation of high concentration hydrogen gas improves short-term outcomes in a rat model of asphyxia induced-cardiac arrest.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA.
2
Department of Basic Science, Division of Physiology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.
4
Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA.

Abstract

Cardiogenic global brain hypoxia-ischemia is a devastating medical problem that is associated with unfavorable neurologic outcomes. Low dose hydrogen gas (up to 2.9%) has been shown to be neuroprotective in a variety of brain diseases. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of water by electrolysis-derived high concentration hydrogen gas (60%) in a rat model of asphyxia induced-cardiac arrest and global brain hypoxia-ischemia. High concentration hydrogen gas was either administered starting 1 hour prior to cardiac arrest for 1 hour and starting 1 hour post-resuscitation for 1 hour (pre- & post-treatment) or starting 1 hour post-resuscitation for 2 hours (post-treatment). In animals subjected to 9 minutes of asphyxia, both therapeutic regimens tended to reduce the incidence of seizures and neurological deficits within 3 days post-resuscitation. In rats subjected to 11 minutes of asphyxia, significantly worse neurological deficits were observed compared to 9 minutes asphyxia, and pre- & post-treatment had a tendency to improve the success rate of resuscitation and to reduce the seizure incidence within 3 days post-resuscitation. Findings of this preclinical study suggest that water electrolysis-derived 60% hydrogen gas may improve short-term outcomes in cardiogenic global brain hypoxia-ischemia.

KEYWORDS:

cardiac arrest; global brain ischemia; high concentration hydrogen gas; neurological deficit; rat; seizure; water electrolysis

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