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Neuron. 2018 Nov 21;100(4):953-963.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.09.019. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Gamma Synchronization between V1 and V4 Improves Behavioral Performance.

Author information

1
Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, 60528 Frankfurt, Germany.
2
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, 6525 EN Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, Center for Neuroscience, Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam, 1098 XH Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, 60528 Frankfurt, Germany; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, 6525 EN Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address: pascal.fries@esi-frankfurt.de.

Abstract

Behavior is often driven by visual stimuli, relying on feedforward communication from lower to higher visual areas. Effective communication depends on enhanced interareal coherence, but it remains unclear whether this coherence occurs at an optimal phase relation that actually improves stimulus transmission to behavioral report. We recorded local field potentials from V1 and V4 of macaques performing an attention task during which they reported changes in the attended stimulus. V1-V4 gamma synchronization immediately preceding the stimulus change partly predicted subsequent reaction times (RTs). RTs slowed systematically as trial-by-trial interareal gamma phase relations deviated from the phase relation at which V1 and V4 synchronized on average. V1-V4 gamma phase relations accounted for RT differences of 13-31 ms. Effects were specific to the attended stimulus and not explained by local power or phase. Thus, interareal gamma synchronization occurs at the optimal phase relation for transmission of sensory inputs to motor responses.

KEYWORDS:

attention; coherence; communication; effective connectivity; gamma band; oscillation; phase relation; reaction time; rhythm; visual cortex

PMID:
30318415
PMCID:
PMC6250574
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2018.09.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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