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Food Chem Toxicol. 2018 Dec;122:181-193. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2018.10.031. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Tea polyphenols direct Bmal1-driven ameliorating of the redox imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction in hepatocytes.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Functional Chemistry and Nutrition of Food, College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, 712100, China.
2
Laboratory of Functional Chemistry and Nutrition of Food, College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, 712100, China. Electronic address: xueboliu@aliyun.com.

Abstract

Circadian rhythms are intimately linked to cellular redox status homeostasis via the regulation of mitochondrial function. Tea polyphenols (TP) are nutraceuticals that possess powerful antioxidant properties, especially ameliorating oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate whether circadian clock is involved in the protection effect of TP on oxidative stress cell models. TP ameliorate H2O2-triggered relatively shallow daily oscillations and phase shift of circadian clock genes transcription and protein expression. Meanwhile, TP attenuate H2O2-stimulated excessive secretions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore the depletions of mitochondrial function in a Bmal1-dependent manner. Furthermore, TP treatment accelerates nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and modulates the downstream expressions of antioxidant enzymes. Intriguingly, knockdown of Bmal1 notably blocked Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 redox-sensitive transcription pathway. Our study revealed that TP, as a Bmal1-enhancing natural compound, alleviated redox imbalance via strengthening Keap1/Nrf2 antioxidant defense pathway and ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction in a Bmal1-dependent manner.

KEYWORDS:

Bmal1; Circadian clock; Mitochondrial function; Nrf2/ARE/HO-1; Oxidative stress; Tea polyphenols

PMID:
30316844
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2018.10.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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